Britain and Irish separatism, from the Fenians to the Free State, 1867-1922
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Britain and Irish separatism, from the Fenians to the Free State, 1867-1922

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Published by Rand McNally College Pub. Co. in Chicago .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Ireland,
  • Ireland.

Subjects:

  • Irish question,
  • Home rule -- Ireland,
  • Nationalism -- Ireland,
  • Ireland -- Politics and government -- 19th century

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementThomas E. Hachey.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDA957 .H25
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 343 p. ;
Number of Pages343
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5198058M
ISBN 100528660047
LC Control Number75020666
OCLC/WorldCa3098436

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Get this from a library! Britain and Irish separatism: from the Fenians to the Free State, [Thomas E Hachey] -- "Even more so than the Young Ireland rising of , the Fenian rebellion was an unqualified fiasco." So states Professor Hachey in the introduction to Britain and Irish Separatism. Britain and Irish separatism, from the Fenians to the Free State, The Irish Experience Since A Concise History by Thomas E. Hachey () Britain and Irish Separatism . He wrote Britain and Irish Separatism: From the Fenians to the Free State (), coauthored and edited The Problem of Partition: Peril to World Peace (); coedited Voices of Revolution: Rebels and Rhetoric (), and edited Anglo-Vatican Relations, Confidential Annual Reports of the British Ministers to the Holy See. Fenianism: a hard movement to pin down. Soldiers of Liberty: A Study of Fenianism review: Eva Ó Cathaoir extends to the memoir literature more credibility than others have to date.

Britain and Irish Separatism from the Fenians to the Free State, by Thomas E. Hachey Britain and Irish Separatism from the Fenians to the Free State, by . The Irish War of Independence led to the Anglo-Irish Treaty. The treaty was given legal effect in the United Kingdom through the Irish Free State Constitution Act , and in Ireland by ratification by Dáil the former Act, at 1pm on 6 December , King George V (at a meeting of his Privy Council at Buckingham Palace) signed a proclamation establishing the new Irish Free State. Thomas E. Hachey is Professor of Irish, Irish-American, and British history and Chair of the department at Marquette University. He wrote Britain and Irish Separatism: From the Fenians to the Free State (), coauthored and edited The Problem of Partition: Peril to World Peace (); coedited Voices of Revolution: Rebels and Rhetoric (), and edited Anglo-Vatican Relations.   The Fenians were members of the so-called Fenian movement in Ireland and elsewhere, though primarily America and England. The Fenians wanted one simple desire for Ireland – independence from British rule. The Great Famine had a massive impact on Ireland. Some in Ireland believed that the government in London – to solve the ‘Irish Problem’ – had deliberately done as little .

Thomas Hachey, Britain and Irish Separatism: From the Fenians to the Free State, – (orig., ; Washington, DC: Catholic University Press, ), –; Kautt, The Anglo-Irish War, –, Buy this book on publisher's site; Personalised recommendations. the Fenian Brotherhood (), and the Clan-na-Gael (). The term Fenian itself was a variant of ‘Fianna’, the name of a mythological band of Irish warriors. The term Fenian was widely employed in both nationalist and anti-nationalist propaganda in the second half of the nineteenth century to refer to the medley of Irish organi-. Thomas E. Hachey is Professor of Irish, Irish-American, and British history and Chair of the department at Marquette University. He wrote Britain and Irish Separatism: From the Fenians to the Free State (), coauthored and edited The Problem of Partition: Peril to World Peace (); coedited Voices of Revolution: Rebels and.   The Fenian Movement was an Irish revolutionary campaign which sought to overthrow the British rule of Ireland in the last half of the 19th century. The Fenians planned an uprising in Ireland which was thwarted when plans for it were discovered by the British.